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“Vodka Eyeballing”: What’s The Matter With Kids Today?

June 10, 2010

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Now I've heard it all, the latest trend from the youth in England is called "Vodka Eyeballing."  It involves putting an open bottle of vodka in direct contact with one's open eye!  The claim is that it leads to a faster high, although it appears that those doing it on YouTube are already wasted!

The American Academy of Ophthalmology has issued a statement that I totally agree with:

A dangerous drinking game called "vodka eyeballing" is
attracting public attention on YouTube. People need to be aware that
anyone who pours vodka directly into his eye risks damaging the surface
epithelial cells–often causing pain and infection. More
seriously, "eyeballing" can also lead to permanent vision damage by
killing endothelial cells in deeper layers of the eye's cornea. This is
unlikely, but possible. The cornea is the clear outer part of the eye
that focuses light and provides much of the optical power. Depending on
the amount of alcohol and length of time it is in contact with the eye,
epithelial cell loss could result in corneal ulcers or scarring, not to
mention a great deal of pain. And if endothelial cells die off, vision
recovery would be uncertain. "Eyeballers" do not even get a "quick high"
as claimed, because the volume of vodka absorbed by the conjunctiva and
cornea is too small to have that effect.

The American Academy of Ophthalmology strongly advises the
public not to engage in "vodka eyeballing."

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